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RETURNS:

If you neither washed nor wore your Shabby Apple clothing and the red thread trace is still intact, you can return it within 30 days of delivery for a refund in the form of original payment (minus original shipping costs). Returns are subject to the “Limits” listed below.

EXCHANGES:

If you neither washed nor wore your Shabby Apple clothing and the red thread trace is still intact, you can exchange it within 30 days of delivery for another Shabby Apple product. When exchanging for a less expensive item, you will receive a partial refund; when exchanging for a more expensive item, you’ll receive a credit in the amount of the price of the originally purchased item and be charged for the difference. Exchanges are subject to the “Limitations” listed below.

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The women of the 1940s were the perfect blend of style and substance. With World War II taking over the international stage, they stepped up on the home front, looking sleek and chic all the way.

The United States’ entry into World War II in 1941 changed everything, including hemlines. With fabric and other goods now rationed, skirts came to the knee and not an inch longer. Women favored the “convertible suit,” a short jacket, A-line, knee-length skirt and blouse, which could be easily transformed into evening wear by shedding the jacket once the workday was over. With no silk stockings available, many women gave the illusion of stockings by drawing a line up the back of their legs with eyeliner. And for women streaming into factories and other traditionally male industries, pants became the norm for the first time.

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Posted by: shabby apple

I am not sure where my obsession began with vintage things. Maybe it was the time I got into my grandmother’s jewelry when I was 3 or when my mom introduced me to Mad Men. Either way, I'm a fan of all things vintage. There is something so captivating about past generations. I like to imagine a time when things were simpler and the world was a bit slower paced. Let's not forget the vintage fashion. I love it most of all.

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I still remember the first time I saw Gone With the Wind. I was mesmerized by Vivien Leigh. I thought she was the most beautiful woman I had ever seen. And her dresses?! They were dreamy. It's thanks to her that I've always been in love with a long, full skirt. It was a childhood fantasy to wear one of those dresses. Tell me I'm not alone?!

That's why when I first saw the Waltzing Matilda Ball Skirt, my heart jumped out of my chest. It immediately reminded me of Scarlett O’Hara and her skirts that I've always dreamed of wearing.

The Waltzing Matilda Ball Skirt is a floor length ball skirt that is constructed to be feminine and flattering. It sits at the natural waistline and is fitted through the hip. It elegantly flares out at the low hip and inverted pleats create flow and movement.

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Shabby Apple was founded on the belief that a dress should be a one-piece outfit—no tank tops, cardigans, or slips needed—just a classic gown with a flattering design.  In order to pull this off, we shouldn’t have to tuck and pull at our wardrobe before leaving the house! In our newest line, Aussie Afternoon, we’ve released an array of dresses, skirts, and blouses that will make you feel classy and comfortable no matter where your day takes you.

Lazy Day Blouse in Yellow 

Sydney Or Bust Dress

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You may not have snow yet (or perhaps your neck of the woods doesn't get snow at all), but one fact is undeniable - the holiday season is upon us. That means you will have parties to attend frequently, whether it's your office party, a family get-together or even the ugly sweater party. The latter has become a staple of the holiday season, but I say you should wear your "ugly" sweater with pride and non-ironically all through the season! Here, use 1940's film actress Deanna Durbin as your spirit guide:

Not wearing a winter coat outside is ill-advised at best /mom

Holiday outfits are so much more than toques (I'm Canadian - I don't know what they are called elsewhere. A beanie?), a knit sweater and some thin gloves. Let's look at some classic holiday films that prove you can still be flawless while dodging patches of ice on the sidewalk.

It's a Wonderful Life

Released in 1946, It's A Wonderful Life is a little dark and a lot hopeful. Donna Reed's outfits range from comfortable (like the cozy dress above) to impeccably tailored and form fitting.

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Please join me in welcoming these lovely tartans and tweeds to the Shabby Apple fashion family. This new collection traveled all the way to Scotland where they walked the moors, listened to bagpipes, and mingled with sheep. Sure enough, they fit right in and I have no doubt they’ll fit nicely into your closet too.
 
As discussed in this post, tartan was one of the earliest recognized patterns still in use today. Tweed, on the other hand, has a more diverse history. Traditionally the fabric was used for the elite, but eventually it became popular among middle class families who associated it with leisure activities like shooting and biking. Later, due to the durability of the fabric, it landed in lower class closets as well—it’s the everyman’s fabric! Similarly, plaid patterns are a fall season staple and we are excited to bring you a vintage combination of both. Visit our Tartans and Tweeds page to view the full collection of peplum, plaid, and floral designs.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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One of the oldest fashion statements still thriving today is the use of plaid. This crisscrossed pattern—properly referred to as tartan—traveled across Asia, marched through the Roman Empire, and arrived in the British Isles. However, despite its scattered origins tartan is most commonly associated with little grey dogs and kilts; and of course the mother country of, Scotland.
 
Since the early years, the pattern has evolved into a staple for much more than kilts and capes. In fact, it has become a necessity for winter wardrobes across the world. But what is it about this vintage checkered design that calls to us so? In Scotland, tartan was used to identify specific clans, and today it still carries a comforting ambiance—like wearing a little piece of home. Even if you don’t relate to the clan-based origin of the design, you’ll love the classic look of our Tartans and Tweeds collection. Below is a small preview of our 1940s Scottish-inspired patterns releasing this week. The line consists of plaid dresses, peplum dresses, pleated dresses and fall dresses galore!
 
 
 
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